Products

  • Granite

  • Granite is one of the most popular of different countertop materials. There are many different types of minerals in granite, some of which appear like small, shiny flecks or longer veins of varying colors. Granite itself comes in many different natural colors and can be polished or finished in many different ways. The stone is naturally durable and water resistant with antibacterial and stain proof characteristics. Granite is also scratch and heat resistant.

  • Marble

  • Marble is another popular choice of different countertop materials. Commercially, any stone that can be polished is also known as marble, with the exception of granite. This includes serpentine, travertine, limestone and onyx. Often called the “green” marble, serpentine marble is not actually marble but looks very similar and is more stain and spill proof than marble. Marble comes in a wide variety of colors and with different vein colors and sizes.

  • Limestone

  • Limestone is a versatile material with many uses. Most limestone from the United States is light in color, ranging from yellow to pink to gray in color. Limestone imported from other countries is often light or even dark red, brown or black. Select limestone with mineral dolomite present, as this type of limestone can be polished and is harder than other types of limestone.

  • Travertine

  • Travertine is common for both exterior and interior purposes. Most natural travertine is dark, ranging from ecru to dark red, with a variety of vein colors. Natural travertine is softer than marble or granite and should be sealed.

  • Slate

  • The vibrant colors and unique texture makes slate tile an exceptional interior flooring alternative. Slate is formed of compressed layers of sediments formed under the ocean. Its tough composition makes it resistant to fading, scratches, and even chemicals. Although it needs to be sealed regularly, slate tiles last virtually forever with a little maintenance. With over 25 color options to choose from, slate tile can make a wonderful addition to any room, even those in colder climates.

  • Ceramic

  • Ceramic tiles are a popular choice of flooring due to their aesthetic appeal, as well as their durability and easy care. A properly installed ceramic tile floor will outperform and outlast nearly any other floor covering product created for the same application. Modern technologies have added to the range of shades, finishes and shapes available. In addition, there has been a resurgence of more traditional looks with terracotta and other natural unglazed finishes.

  • Quartz

  • Made from one of the hardest minerals on earth, quartz countertops are arguably the most durable option for kitchens. They’re also some of the most eye-catching. They come in a wide variety of colors, including fire-engine red and apple green, as well as earthy browns, blacks, and creams, with sparkles and veining for the look of granite or marble. But unlike natural-stone slabs, which are mined, these slabs are engineered in a factory.

  • Porcelain

  • Add a stylish touch to any room with porcelain flooring. It is ideal for its beauty and versatility and can also be used in any room in your house. Porcelain is an excellent choice to decorate walls as well. Fine porcelain stoneware features an extremely dense and impact-resistant body with low water absorption that makes it “outdoor” friendly, even in freeze-thaw areas.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Granite?

Granite is an igneous rock that is formed under the earth’s surface from its magma, which is composed of a variety of minerals such as: quartz, feldspar, and mica. Granite got its name from the Latin word “granum”, which means grain. This is because it is a coarse-grained mineral and is classified as such by mineralogists. Granite gains its own unique and distinct texture from this grainy feature.

Where does granite come from?

Granite comes from far below the earth’s surface and forms during a process that can take upwards of thousands of years. Over a long period of time, liquid magma is forced back and forth between different layers of rock. When it finally cools, it forms a solid layer of granite rock. Granite acquires its signature crystalline appearance from the trace mineral elements that are still attached to the surface after its cooling process. It is during this process that granite becomes an extremely hard and durable stone, making it perfect for countertops and vanities.

How do I maintain my granite?

Once granite is originally sealed, it is quite easy to maintain. The first sealing of granite is one of the most important because granite is naturally porous and will stain very easily without it. After you seal your countertop, your granite is protected and is now ready for use. Remember that it is imperative that you reseal your granite counters at minimum once per year. This can be done either on your own or can be done by a professional. Either way it will help to ensure that your granite countertops remain stain free. If there is a spill, make sure to clean it up before the stain gets a chance to seep into the surface. Because of its porous nature, granite is somewhat absorbent and even when sealed can still absorb stains if spills are left untouched for any extended period of time.

What is the life expectancy of granite?

Granite is an extremely impressive stone. Granite is tough, stain and scratch resistant and can handle some serious heat. Granite can withstand temperatures up to 900 degrees Fahrenheit (482.22 degrees Celsius) without causing damage. Experts will tell you that cutting on your counters won’t hurt the countertops at all, it will only dull your knives. Short of trying to cut your granite with a diamond or, more dramatically, smashing it with a sledge hammer, it will not break or even crack. These statements are just some of the evidence available that will prove that you’re granite countertops can last a lifetime.

What are the different types of granite finishes?

There is a large variety of ways to go about granite countertops production. Granite surfaces are finished in many ways. They can be polished, honed, flamed or brushed; each technique will add its own unique look and texture to the stone.

A polished finish is definitely the most common because of a few key factors involved. Polished finishes will help to give your home a distinct and elegant look. This type of finish is a great choice, especially for kitchens.A polished finish is easier to maintain than most other finishes and its sparkling appearance brings out the all of the color in your granite. Granite’s polished finish can often be described as both shiny and mirror-like.
Honed finishes are slowly becoming more and more popular for newly installed granite countertops. This type of finish is smooth and also less shiny than the polished finishes. Its less shimmering appearance gives your home a slightly more causal and contemporary feel while still maintaining the elegant feel granite is known for providing.

A drawback of honed finishes is they are, unfortunately, known to show more stains when compared to other finishes. Don’t let this deter you from this choice however; as long as you make any effort to clean, maintain and care for your countertops, they will be just fine. There are also certain sealers and various types of treatments that will help keep your beautiful honed countertops stain free. Just like all other granite countertops and finishes, honed countertops are extremely durable and,if taken care of, will last a lifetime.

Another way to go about granite countertops production is to give them a flamed finish.
Flamed finishes are created by exposing a piece of granite to extremely intense heat followed immediately by intense cooling. This exposure to extreme temperature change causes the granite to melt, and in the process, shatter some crystals. This leaves the granite with a highly textured surface. Flamed finishes are generally seen in an industrial environment because of the traction benefits. Despite their usual use, flamed finish granite countertops are also a great choice for your home. Flamed finishes are the perfect solution if you are interested in a surface that is textured and slip resistant.

Brushed finishes, which are also known as antiqued finishes, are created by gently brushing the granite’s surface which develops a worn-in look throughout the stone. This finish can give your countertops a more dramatic look when compared to the other finishes.

What is the best way to go about granite countertop maintenance?

Once granite is originally sealed, it is quite easy to maintain. The first sealing of granite is one of the most important because granite is naturally porous and will stain very easily without it. After you seal your countertop, your granite is protected and is now ready for use. Remember that it is imperative that you reseal your granite counters at minimum once per year. This can be done either on your own or can be done by a professional. Either way it will help to ensure that your granite countertops remain stain free. If there is a spill, make sure to clean it up before the stain gets a chance to seep into the surface. Because of its porous nature, granite is somewhat absorbent and even when sealed can still absorb stains if spills are left untouched for any extended period of time.

Generally, you are able to clean your granite countertop using just a soft clean cloth alongside a neutral cleaner. You should definitely consider the use of a disinfectant type cleaner that is specially designed for granite. The use of regular cleaning products on your countertop should absolutely be avoided at all costs. These chemicals will take the seal right off and leave behind it the vulnerable and porous surface of the natural granite stone unprotected and exposed.We encourage you to call your stone dealer with any questions or about countertop maintenance, care or even cleaning.

What are the variations in thickness between granite slabs and materials?

Granite is available in a wide variety of thicknesses. The most popular thickness is a 3 cm, or 1-1/4”, thickness but it is also available in a 2 cm, or 3/4” thickness.

The weight of a slab varies, of course, in relation to its thickness. The weight of a granite slab is generally 12-13 lbs per sqft in a 2 cm thickness and 18-19 lbs per sqft in a 3 cm thickness.For example, an 8-foot countertop slab that is 3 cm thick will weigh somewhere between 144-152 lbs. The granite thicknesses can vary as much as +/- 3 mm throughout the slab. Due to the fact that granite tends to not be a uniform thickness throughout the whole slab, installers will compensate for the width variations with added support.

Laminate is generally made up of 1/8” thick panels attached to a ¾” thick wooden product. Solid surface countertop material normally comes in three different standard thicknesses, they are: ¼”, ½”, or ¾”. Soapstone is usually 1-1/4” thick, marble is usually 1-3/4” to 2”, concrete material is generally 1-1/2” to 2”, and finally, engineered stone usually comes in 1-1/4” thickness.